This Female Airline Pilot Shares The Moment She Got Fed Up With 'Woman Driver' Jokes

This Female Airline Pilot Shares The Moment She Got Fed Up With 'Woman Driver' Jokes

There are some stereotypes that exist for a reason and are funny to point out that don’t really harm anybody: like all French people wear scarves.

So when Jerry Seinfeld had Gad Elmaleh on an episode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee and noticed he was wearing a scarf, he went on a whole thing about it and it was great, both him and Gad had a wonderful laugh about it.

Finding what’s truly funny about a stereotype in a comedy bit, however, is one thing, especially when a lot of people perceive it to be true. But then there are stereotypes that are just not true and the only reason people refer to them or bring them up are in a cheap attempt to be funny. One such stereotype is the misconception that women are statistically worse drivers than men.

As it turns out though, that perception is categorically false. Now any subject matter could be made fun of, even this unfair stereotype, but what makes this one particularly harmful was highlighted by this airline pilot who shared her experiences of dealing with snarky remarks from passengers who all made the same joke, more or less, about the fact that she was flying the plane and not a man.

Her response to the jokes were on the money: she’s qualified to fly a really, really, expensive commercial airliner, while the people cracking jokes to her are just qualified to keep their seatbelts on until the overhead light turns off.

Charlotte admits that the jokes never really bothered her or got her to think past the lame quip until a fellow crew member got upset.

Charlotte believes that this nonchalant attitude people have towards women attempting careers in male-dominated fields is exactly what so few women become pilots or enroll in STEM programs.

She admitted that her own feelings aren’t of anger or frustration, she’s just sad that the world is still full of people who think it’s OK to say that to a woman who is clearly qualified to do her job.

Charlotte’s tweets quickly went viral, and it got other people sharing their own annoying run-ins with people who felt the need to belittle the work female pilots do.

Like this one guy’s wife who flew for the military but still gets belittled by passengers when she flies.

Other people thought that Charlotte’s response to passengers was perfect and told her not to go too hard on them.

And there were some other people who offered up some suggestions as to how Charlotte should respond next time.

As it turns out, Charlott’s captain had some choice words for some passengers.

Obviously, it’s not just in the airline industry where women face prejudice when it comes to dealing with men.

But since Charlotte was talking about flying planes, there were people pointing out that yes, it’s not uncommon for women to be incredible pilots. Like this guy’s daughter.

Hearing a female captain’s voice also has a profound effect on some passengers, saying it sets an example for every woman on the flight.

So the next time you want to make a joke about stereotypically bad drivers, make sure that you’re at least picking the right demographic to make fun of.

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Airline In Finland Will Start Weighing Passengers Before They Can Board

Finnair plans to start weighing passengers before they board their flight in an effort to work out just how much extra weight their planes are carrying. It’s no secret that waistlines across the industrialized world are expanding, the average American man weighs 15 pounds more now than he did 20 years ago. 

This rapid rise presents a problem for Finnair, who are currently balancing their planes based on estimates from the European Aviation Safety Agency, which were made eight years ago, according to The Sun.

According to the old estimates, the average male passengers weighs 185 pounds, while the average female weighs 144 pounds. However, the average Finnish man is 2 pounds heavier than that estimate, and the average Finnish woman is 11 pounds heavier. 

The airline wants to stick between 100 and 150 of its passengers on the scales before every flight to get a better idea of how much the average customer weighs. 

They’re not planning on penalizing anyone they consider overweight, though. However, the program could cut operating costs by giving them more exact estimates on just how much fuel every flight needs. 

Sami Suokas, manager of customer processes at Finnair, said:

Suokas revealed that they’re starting now because passengers tend to fluctuate in weight between summer and winter. 

This isn’t the first time an airline has weighed passengers. Hawaiian Airlines weighed passengers for six months in 2016 on their route between Honolulu and the American Samoa. 

Samoans have one of the highest rates of obesity in the world, and the airline won the right to put passengers on the scales to save fuel and prevent accidents despite numerous complaints to courts from passengers.  

Hawaiian Airlines have since completed their study. 

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13 Airline Meals You'll Actually Look Forward To Eating

If you’ve ever flown for more than two hours by airplane and were subject to an entree that was more military ration than home-cooked meal, then you too understand why the $ 6 slice of cheese pizza sold out of a kiosk prior to boarding your flight may not be a bad deal after all.

Part of it is the difference in air pressure. Once we start gaining altitude, our olfactory senses are the first to go, and our tastebuds with them. The combination of cool, dry air in the cabin and the lower air pressure essentially numb our taste buds, and cause us to experience the exact same meal that could be quite tasty on the ground in a less than ideal manner.

Pay enough for your plane ticket however, and the chefs in charge of keeping you satiated a few dozen thousand feet off the ground will adjust their recipe to compensate for your lack of taste.

Call me when Taco Bell decides to open up shop in the sky.

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