Model Calls out Huda Beauty for Using Her Face to Talk About Removing Acne Scars

And that includes giving off the illusion that your skin is flawless and blemish-free.

Although we know that a ton of work goes into the Instagram posts that we lowkey adore and are jealous of, feeling self-conscious is super easy. Especially when there are certain things about your body that you can’t change. Which is why there are so many accounts out there that are trying to make people feel a bit more positive about their bodies, like Em Ford’s MyPaleSkinBlog.

image

Instagram has become a huge hub for all sorts of wellness and personal betterment products, and when you’re on a platform that’s flooded with selfies and examples of personal beauty, it only makes sense that tons of beauticians and makeup artists blew up as a result of Instagram’s surge in popularity.

Like Huda Beauty, which was started by ace cosmetics blogger, Huda Kattan.

image

If you want a sick contour, eyeshadow, or any other super-glam look, Huda’s your girl. I mean I’m a North-Jersey bro whose entire aesthetic can be summed up as “What would Costco look like if it was turned into a human being,” but even I have a solid appreciation for the magic Huda and other beauty bloggers create with a palette and some brushes.

And while seeing super jacked/lean dudes makes me feel self-conscious about my dad-bod, that doesn’t mean I’m being “shamed” simply because someone else is existing. If it bothers me that much, I should just get in the best possible shape I can get in to feel good about myself. Nobody’s out there body-shaming me and posting pictures of my flab online saying, “Ewww look at this dude.”

image

So I can understand model Em Ford’s shock when a post on the Huda Beauty Facebook page on how to get rid of acne scars featured her face, with the following headline:

“The Only Way To Get Rid Of Acne Scars According To The Experts”

Em was offended on two levels. The first being that Huda’s site used her images without her permission.

The second was that the image she posted was specifically for skin positivity, so that those who suffered from acne could feel better about themselves. So for it to be turned around and used in a piece on how to cover up acne scars — that really rubbed Em the wrong way.

In her Instagram stories, Em shared her disappointment at Huda’s decision to use her face as part of an “anti-acne” campaign.

Dear @hudabeauty, I wanted to thank you for using my #skinpositivity images to tell the world that my face full of scars is worse than active breakouts. 

And for reinforcing the narrative that anything less than “flawless” is something that we should feel ashamed of, or want to fix and “get rid of.”

Headlines like that are the reason why I receive thousands of emails on a daily and weekly basis from women all over the world. 

Some of whom are made to feel so ashamed of their skin, it affects every aspect of their lives. And couldn’t even dream of enjoying themselves on holiday without applying a full coverage foundation. 

Since 2015, I have used my platforms and voice to talk about hate online, and why perpetuating beauty standards has very real, and very serious consequences.”

image

Ford’s message resonated with users online, many of who suffered from acne scars, or struggled to meet “society’s” beauty standards.

image

Others pointed out that the Huda Beauty article sends a confusing message — especially when compared to other articles that supported the use of cosmetic fillers and encouraging women to grow out their body hair if they want.

Which was flabbergasting and hurtful to some Twitter users who took years to become comfortable with their own acne scars.

image

The post has since been taken down from Huda’s Facebook page, and Em has followed up by saying that Huda contacted her with a full apology.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Distractify

Chrissy Teigen Pays Fan's Tuition For Beauty School And Brings Twitter To Tears

Mercedes Edney, an independent skin care consultant and the owner of Ixora Botanical Beauty, recently had an online fundraiser to help her pay her way through beauty school. With a goal of $ 6,000, it had been running for a month, and picked up about $ 400. 

That is until one generous follower decided to donate the difference. That follower? Chrissy Teigen, of course. 

As you can imagine, Edney was pretty excited. 

Teigen responded by saying that she’d donated so that Edney could peruse her dreams. 

Edney was blown away, and said that she’s already used the money to pay the school.

People were pretty impressed by the show of generosity. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

home – Channel RSS

Ashley Graham Defied The Beauty Industry And Landed 'Vogue' Magazine Cover

When you think of Vogue magazine covers, images of impossibly thin or in-shape models probably come to mind. And you wouldn’t be wrong for thinking it, either. Of course we all know these photos are picture perfect, and that some people are more “genetically gifted” than others or work their butts off to look a certain way, but it’s easy to look at a lot of these covers and start to feel horribly inadequate.

Especially if you’re body shape just won’t allow you to be that thin. Then what are you supposed to do? Not be beautiful?

I mean that kind of talk is ridiculous, because beauty isn’t restricted to one size. I’m not saying every person in the world is physically attractive, but just because you aren’t super thin doesn’t mean you’re not super hot.

Just ask model Ashley Graham who’s both big and beautiful.

Despite gracing the cover of Sports Illustrated, Graham was told she’d never ever make the cover of Vogue.

Well look at her now. She posed on the cover with Liu Wen, Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Imaan Hammam, Adwoa Aboah, and Vittoria Ceretti.

2
inez and vinoodh

Vogue wrote that the cover represents how beauty isn’t defined in any one particular way.

“[Each model] proudly inhabits her own particular gorgeousness in her own particular way. Together they represent a seismic social shift: The new beauty norm is no norm.”

The “particular gorgeousness” of Graham is that she’s rocking curves. She’s what scientists would refer to as being “properly stacked”.

1
inez and vinoodh

Ahsley even used her Vogue blurb to shout out that her body type is the majority of what women look like in America.

“Sixty-seven percent of the women in America wear a size 14 or larger. Sixty-seven percent. Maybe you could ignore those consumers before, but now, thanks to social media, they’re making their voices heard. Women are demanding that brands give them what they want. And what they want is to be visible.”

That’s a pretty strong point, don’t you think? (h/t cosmopolitan)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Distractify