One Week After Couple Adopts Triplets, Their Doctor Gives Them This News

Sometimes destiny can throw you a curveball. This is particularly true in the case of Sarah and Andy Justice, a Tulsa, Oklahoma couple desperately longing to be parents. After years of unsuccessful attempts at conception, the Justices decided it was time to consider adoption.

Yet, like their three long years waiting to conceive, the adoption process proved equally frustrating. Still, the couple persevered and was soon given the chance to adopt not just one, not two, but three babies. Once the triplets were born, however, something unbelievable happened… 

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Sarah and Andy Justice had been married for three years and while they were loving life together, they were missing one, vital thing: children of their own. It wasn’t for lack of trying, mind you, they just hadn’t had any luck conceiving. After three years of waiting, it seemed they would have to look into some sort of help. 

Sarah and Andy decided that it was time to seek the advice of a fertility expert. In early 2014, the two traveled from their home in Tulsa, OK to St. Louis, MO to enlist the aid of a fertility specialist. The Justices drove for nearly six hours, but when they got there, they received more bad news… 

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The specialist told the couple that while they were perfect candidates for in-vitro fertilization treatment, there was still only a 10% chance that they would ever become pregnant. The process was also a bit more invasive than the couple had been prepared for. What’s more, the process wasn’t exactly going to be cheap, either. 

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As it turns out, in-vitro fertilization costs a pretty penny. The process would cost the Justices between $ 30,000 and $ 60,000. Between the extremely prohibitive cost and the fact that even if they did try it, it might not work, the couple decided that this was not the right path for them. So they went to the next logical step: adoption… 

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Even adoption had certain difficulties attached to it, however. For one, the process can take years to finalize, and the Justices were, like most people who opt to adopt, interested primarily in newborn babies. Still, they were willing to do whatever they had to in order to get the ball rolling, including a series of interviews. 

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As part of the adoption process, Sarah and Andy had to be interviewed by prospective birth mothers in order for them to determine if the couple would be suitable as parents. The interviews, while cordial and successful in the end, were exhausting and nervewracking for the Justices. Sadly, their struggle to build their family was far from over… 

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The Justices had been accepted as adoptive parents on two separate occasions, following the interviews. Yet in both cases, the birth mothers had changed their minds at the last minute. Just when it seemed like everything was going smoothly, they had to start all over again. But they were not about to give up that easily. 

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Finally, when they were at their lowest, the Justices received a call. One of their expectant mothers had accepted them as parents. They met with her again and even went with her to an ultrasound appointment. Everything appeared perfectly normal during the scan, but there was one little surprise that neither the mother nor the Justices had planned on: the woman was having triplets… 

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Rather than try and renege on the agreement, the Justices decided to move forward with the adoption and accept all three babies. The papers were signed, after all. Sarah and Andy were about to become the proud parents of three beautiful newborns. It was not something they were initially prepared for… 

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As a matter of fact, the situation actually suited the couple perfectly. They had already planned on having more than one child but had dreaded the prospect of undergoing adoption process a second time. It seemed that now they had the perfect situation: multiple children all at once. Soon they were ready to meet their newborn triplets… 

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The babies, Hannah, Joel, and Elizabeth, were born in May 2013. In yet another twist of fate, the triplets were born eight weeks early. The tiny little babies weighed only about three pounds each, which meant that they had to be kept in neonatal intensive care for some time before they could go home with their new parents. 

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A week after their premature birth, Sarah Justice decided to go to a doctor’s appointment by herself. The stress of the whole situation had been affecting her health slightly and she wanted to make sure she was feeling better by the time the triplets came home. When the doctor finally came in, he had some unbelievable news; she was not sick, she was pregnant. It was a miracle, and what’s more, she was expecting twins… 

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Fate is a funny thing. While this amazing, and unlikely, occurrence would have felt like bad timing to most people, the Justices saw the humor in it. The irony of the situation wasn’t lost on them either, or the difficulty that would come with raising five children all under a year old. But Sarah and Andy were mentally and emotionally prepared for what was to come. 

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They were, of course, shocked, even slightly overwhelmed by the news, who wouldn’t be? But they had been longing for a family of their own for so long, they couldn’t help but she the unique situation as a true blessing. Soon they had welcomed their biological twins, Andrew and Abigail, into their home as well. It was going to be a big adjustment… 

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The situation wasn’t easy, obviously. With five hungry babies, the couple didn’t sleep a whole lot in the first few months. Luckily, Sarah and Andy had the support of their community and their family. Friends, neighbors, members of their parish, everyone pitched in to help and provide for the new family of seven. 

Members of Tulsa’s Eastland Baptist Church began to send over food for the family as well. They sent cooked meals, frozen dinners, and baby formula. Their friends at church even offered to help watch the five Justice babies while the couple was away at work. And it wasn’t just food and time their friends provided, either… 

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Diapers, bottles, blankets, clothing: it all came pouring in from donations around Tulsa. The supplies were sorely needed. The five infants went through a whopping 300 diapers and 84 bottles every week. And because it was such a task getting the kids from place to place, they had to get a bigger van. 

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Sarah and Andy had a little trouble telling the babies apart at first, despite their slight age difference. To fix this, they came up with a system. The boys were easy enough, for obvious reasons. But for their older daughters, Hannah and Elizabeth, the parents used different colored toenail polish. Soon, the Justices were internet celebrities… 

The story of the Justice clan instantly went viral and in the three years that passed since the Justices became parents, they have gained an impressive Facebook following. The world is constantly looking at their fantastic photos and updates. In fact, the couple who thought they’d never be parents, even welcomed a sixth child in January of 2016. 

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Despite the crazy demands that the Justices’ face each and every day, they say they wouldn’t change it for the world. Their lives have become all about the babies, but they both feel that it’s a good thing. “It was something we’ve wanted so badly that we love it,” says Sarah Justice. “We just really love having these children.” 

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Merriam-Webster Just Perfectly Trolled Sexist “Doctor Who” Fans

Merriam-Webster needed only six words to shut down sexistDr. Whofans who complained about the show’s latest casting announcement.

Over the weekend, it was announced that Jodie Whittaker will become the first female Dr. Whoin the 50 year history of the franchise.

Predictably, this ruffled the feathers of some of the show’s less enlightened fans.

On Monday, in response to the sexists complaining about Whittaker’s casting, Merriam-Webster posted this expert level burn to Twitter.

Twitter couldn’t get enough of the dictionary’s on point smack down.

Merriam-Webster even sparked a conversation about gender and language, schooling folks on both sides of theDr. Whodivide.

Come to think of it, dictionary has no gender either but when it comes to sexist Dr. Whofans, this dictionary has Jodie Whittaker’s back!

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You're Less Likely To Die If You Have A Female Doctor, According To Science

While the field of medicine was once dominated by men, female physicians now make up about one-third of the physician work force — and over half of all medical school graduates are women.

As it turns out, research suggests that men and women practice medicine differently — and one group is having more success than the other. 

A new study, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, found that female doctors working in hospitals have lower 30-day patient mortality and readmission rates.

What, exactly, does that mean? Well, according to according to researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, patients with female physicians are less likely to die. 

Scientists reviewed 1.5 million 30-day hospitalizations of elderly Medicare patients taking place between 2011 and 2014. Within that time period, patients treated by female physicians had lower mortality rates than patients with male physicians (11.07 and 11.49 percent, respectively). Patients treated by female doctors also had lower readmission rates (15.02 percent compared to 15.57 percent). 

While the percentage differences between patient groups may seem insignificant, the number of lives affected is, indeed, significant. 

According to the study’s authors, “32,000 fewer patients would die if male physicians could achieve the same outcomes as female physicians [each year].”

And how do we account for the gap in quality of care? Previous studies have found that female doctors are more likely to follow clinical guidelines, offer preventative care, and recommend psychological counseling to patients. 

But more research will be necessary to determine the specifics. “Understanding exactly why these differences in care quality and practice patterns exist may provide valuable insights into improving quality of care for all patients, irrespective of who provides their care,” the study’s authors wrote. 

Despite the difference in patient outcomes, female doctors are still paid less, on average, than male doctors.  

In an editorial piece accompanying the study, doctors from the University of California, San Francisco noted that female academic physicians are also less likely to ascend to the rank of full professor than men.

However, some doctors believe that these new findings will catalyze equal pay for women. 

With an ever-increasing focus on pay for performance, women are likely to begin making more money in the field — eventually narrowing the gender wage gap plaguing medicine. 

As the doctors wrote in their editorial: 

These findings that female internists provide higher quality care for hospitalized patients yet are promoted, supported, and paid less than male peers in the academic setting should push us to create systems that promote equity in start-up packages, career advancement, and remuneration for all physicians.

(h/t nymag)

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Women Of Color Are Obliterating Delta For Discriminating Against A Doctor Onboard

As if the state of race relations in the United States wasn’t dismal enough, Delta Airlines royally screwed up last weekend by nearly letting a passenger die — all because the flight crew refused to believe that Dr. Tamika Cross, a young woman of color, was an actual doctor who could come to said passenger’s aid. 

Cross’ Facebook post about the blatant discrimination has since gone viral, receiving over 40,000 shares and endless comments. 

Now people, particularly women of color in the medical field, are showing their support for Cross (and teaching Delta a lesson) by posting photos of themselves at work with the hashtag #WhatADoctorLooksLike. 

Whether they’re wearing the coat…

…Or regular clothes (they don’t always wear the doctor outfit ~sarcastic gasp~). 

Also, it looks like Delta’s over 150 years overdue on figuring this out. 

So, Twitter kept on coming with the examples. 

And even tried to put it in terms that Delta might understand.  

…Because this SHOULD NOT be necessary. 

So Delta (and everyone) take Twitter’s sage advice: 

And may all women of color, especially those in the medical field, remember: 

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