Woman Creates Hilarious Auction Ad For Wedding Dress And People Are In Love

Dealing with a break-up is never easy and people have different coping mechanisms.

Whenever I’ve gone through a split, I found hitting the gym harder than usual and cleaning up my diet helped put me in a good frame of mind. Usually I’m so upset that I don’t want to eat in the first place, and with all of the free time I have, those extra hours I put into working out came easily.

It might not be the healthiest way to cope, despite the obvious benefit of having a trimmer bod, and I probably would’ve had a better time with my break-ups if I had a sense of humor about being dumped or doing the dumping.

Like this New Zealand woman did when she penned a hilariously descriptive Trade Me (like craigslist) post auctioning off her wedding dress, which, as the item description indicates, she did after divorcing her husband.

That’s a pretty savage recap of the relationship and what she thinks of her ex.

As of now, the dress is sitting on a $ 665 AUS bid, and the poster’s unfortunately been forced to make comments on the dress private, as media outlets kept bugging her about the ordeal.

This isn’t the first time women have flocked to private seller sites to offload wedding dresses when their relationships didn’t pan out.

Like this guy was put on blast by his fiance after he allegedly cheated on her. 

Or this other woman who had a zinger for her own relationship in this candid wedding dress advertisement.

Her ex-husband eventually came out and gave his side of the story and the two ended things amicably. In fact, he even praised her blog and and industriousness in turning her own personal heartbreak into a positive.

So it’s nice to see that not all break-ups end with heaping spoonfuls of bitterness and loathing. I mean most of them do, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Right?

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Mom Calls Out Designer For Making Her Daughter This Nightmare Prom Dress

Taking a risk on a local designer can have an amazing payoff. You get a handmade gown to your specifications at a cut-rate price. In Malexa Maeweather’s case, she got a cut-rate dress instead. 

Malexa’s mother, Dee Lewis, called out the maker of her daughter’s terrifying prom dress on Facebook because she was so upset by the final product. According to Yahoo News, the pair live in Rochester, New York, and a small designer named Kia Wagner said she would make a dress for Malexa using some cloth she already had on hand. She asked for a $ 100 deposit. This is what Malexa received the night before prom:

In her post, Lewis called out Wagner by name, and asked, “R u serious.. was i wrong for wanting my DEPOSIT BACK [sic].”

You can see that it is a nightmare cloud from the front, the side, and the back:

Lewis told Yahoo News that Malexa had seen a dress she liked on Instagram, but it wasn’t available, so they decided to trust the local designer. 

“For a $ 100 deposit, Kia told my daughter that she would make her something nice with material she already owned and that she wanted to ‘play around with the design,’” said Lewis. “Malexa didn’t know anything about what the dress would look like.”

When it finally arrived, with only one day to replace it, Malexa was extremely upset, as any of us would be.

 “My daughter was devastated and crying when she saw this dress,” said Lewis.

Luckily, a family friend stepped in when they saw the pics, and offered up the dress her daughter had worn the year before. Malexa’s mom gave her a few dollars to have the top redesigned by a different dressmaker, so she’d be wearing a new look. And she it turned out great:

Wagner has not commented on this very public embarrassment (the Facebook post has been shared almost 4,000 times!), and Lewis has said she hasn’t heard from her either.  “She didn’t offer any reimbursement as a professional courtesy,” said Lewis. Maybe she considers her end of the bargain complete and is waiting for the other $ 200?

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Internet Bands Together To Find Woman's 147-Year-Old Wedding Dress

Tess Newall, a bride from Edinburgh, Scotland, got married in June wearing the same gown every woman in her family has worn since her great-great-grandmother. Even cooler? Her great-great-grandmother made it herself way back in 1870.

Some time later, the newlywed took the 147-year-old dress to Kleen Cleaners for a specialty dry clean. But soon after, the store fell into liquidation and Newall was told by administrators Wylie & Bisset that her dress had been lost in the process. 

Distressed, Newall took to Facebook in the hopes that someone might recognize the family heirloom. Her post quickly acquired more than 300,000 shares and 43,000 comments.

She wrote in full:

I have just found out that the dry cleaners have lost my much loved wedding dress. It was made by my Great Great Granny in 1870 (I altered the top) and I wore it in June 2016. Kleen Cleaners in Edinburgh used to be the best but recently fell into crooked hands and have gone into liquidation. It seems that the dress was taken to be sold so it could be winging its way anywhere. Please share this far and wide in case anyone stumbles across it! I realise there are far greater issues in the world but it means the world to us. More family memories need to be woven into its threads.

Thank you so so much.

Love Tess x</span>

Somehow, the post made its way onto the Facebook feed of the person who now owns the building. He checked what was behind by the previous administrators and found “a crumpled heap of antique lace on the floor.”

The owner let Newall&apos;s parents into the shop, where they found that it was the dress they&apos;d been looking for. Newall updated her post to thank everyone for sharing the post.

Despite this letter received today saying..

“it appears that your dress was NOT located with the wedding dresses within the store and as such was DISPOSED OF when the premises were cleared”

..We received a phone call from the very kind landlord of the shop property who had read about it through this amazing response. He checked what was left by the administrators Wylie & Bisset and found a crumpled heap of antique lace on the floor. My mum and dad have just been let into the shop and to their amazement and joy it is our dress! (Still with our ticket attached, but not even cleaned)</span>

But they still have one hurdle left: Actually retrieving the dress and taking it home.

Frustratingly – a representative of Wylie & Bisset who showed up after weeks of ignoring our pleas to let us in insisted that for “procedural reasons” he must take it back to his office in Glasgow, but assure us it will be delivered safely back to us on Monday.

My family can&apos;t thank you all enough for creating this frenzy which allowed us into the shop before it was too late, and are over the moon to be *almost* reunited with Dora&apos;s dress</span>

Still, Facebook commenters were ecstatic at the news. “So very pleased for you,” one user wrote. “Nice to have a happy ending for a change.” The power of the Internet never ceases to amaze. 

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This Bridezilla Tried To Get Her Bridesmaids To Pay For Her $10,000 Dress

We’ve all dealt with bridezillas. But an anonymous bridesmaid recently took to Mamamia to share the insane demands that her friend Caroline made of her bridesmaids. She starts:

At first, I thought Carol was just being a little overzealous when the group emails asking for input on everything from bridesmaid dress colors, hairstyles, makeup looks, bridal dresses, buttonholes for the groomsmen (something I had to Google) and table decorations came flooding through, quickly taking up a large chunk of my day.

Then she started turning into a bridezilla…

During one particularly busy Friday at work – I’m a high school English teacher, so there’s not a lot of down time – I checked my email during a short break between morning classes.

“Hey Hayley, How’s it going? I need some cake-maker suggestions by COB today please, Jase and I really want to get a wriggle on with this and need the contact details, price brackets, flavours and an idea of how prestigious the vendor is – in a table would be great. Excel is probably best please. Thanks!”

I had to read the email about three times to gauge what she was asking me. After the third disbelieving scan, I felt my blood start boiling.

Was she serious?!

“I have a full time job, for crying out loud, how am I meant to get all this info by then?” I thought, panicked.

But she still did as Caroline asked, cancelling her Saturday plans to get her the information…

Surely it’d be OK if I got the information to her over the weekend? I wanted to be a good bridesmaid but what was she going to do with wedding cake information on a Friday evening? I decided to hedge my bets and replied with my plan to have the info to her the following day, apologising and saying that it was a busy day. Of course she’d be okay with that, wouldn’t she?

After no reply from the bride-to-be, I carried on with my day. On Saturday morning I cancelled my breakfast plans, instead researching Tasmanian wedding cake-makers (she’d decided to have a picturesque destination wedding) that might be suitable. I sent it through to her and had a reply almost immediately.

“Thanks for this, would’ve been really helpful to have it yesterday when specified but I appreciate it.”

Ouch. I put it down to “bridal stress” and got back to my normal life, hoping she wasn’t too mad at me.

But things got even worse, when Caroline fell in love with a dress that cost twice her budget – $ 10,500.

A couple of months later – after three consecutive weekends of searching for bridal and bridesmaid dresses (that ended up costing us all $ 550, mind you) – came the clincher.

Caroline had finally found a stunning satin Marchesa wedding dress that she looked perfect in. The only problem was it cost twice her dress budget – $ 10,500. After many “dooo itttt, you should totally splurge, you only get married once” reassurances for her many bridesmaids, she decided to purchase it.

“Thank the lord, now I can have my weekends back,” I thought to myself, breathing a sigh of relief despite feeling a little guilty about it.

That night, my inbox pinged again with another of the group emails from Caroline that I’d started to dread. The subject line was “Bridesmaid dress contribution” and it made me break out into a cold sweat.

Yes, she wanted the bridesmaids to help pay for her dress.

The latest bridal update was a long email outlining how she and Jase were hugely over their bridal budget now that she’d splurged on the dress. That it was “totally fine if you can’t” but she would really love if we could “pitch in” around $ 150 each towards her “dream dress”. That it’d mean so very much to her and would mean that as she walked down the aisle, she’d be wearing something we’d all had a part in.

Yes, she was essentially asking her bridal party to chip in for her dress. As well as our own outfits, accommodation, the hen’s party, bridal shower and the three spa days she wanted us to plan prior to thewedding. My bank account was already taking a battering from the wedding and now this?

I nearly threw my phone across the room, such was the rage that consumed me. It’s been three days since she sent the email and three of the seven bridesmaids have replied saying they’d love to pitch in for her dress. Whether they genuinely wanted to or not, I just don’t know.

But I’m starting to think I might have to bail on this wedding, and friendship.

This bride has lost her damn mind. Does she actually expect her bridesmaids to help pay for her own dress? If so, she’s going to have some open spots if anyone is interested. 

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