Woman Drops Phone On Neighbor's Balcony And Hatches Epic Plan To Get It Back

Try being conscious about your phone use for the day. An easy way to do that is to count the number of times you reach into your pocket to pull it out and look at it. It should be about 72 million times a day, give or take a few pulls.

Or you could just leave your phone at home when you go out somewhere. Count how many seconds it takes before anxiety sets in.

So you can only imagine the horror that Twitter user Liz Bertorelli felt when she somehow dropped her phone onto her downstairs neighbor’s balcony.

She watched, utterly helpless, as her phone moved on without her, receiving notifications that went unchecked. She dropped a note for her neighbor to find, but the wind got in the way.

Users chimed in, offering helpful solutions to her no-phone dilemma.

She then committed to some ideas to see if anything would help get her phone back.

She started getting desperate.

But at least she kept her humor intact throughout the trying ordeal.

Some people demanded to know just where the heck their neighbors were after all this time.

Sadly, she needed to leave for work without her phone.

It turns out the imminent threat of rain became a valid concern.

Someone suggested she contact her building super.

But she already tried that.

Her downstairs neighbors still didn’t pull through, either.

She tried gathering all her phone saving items in her home to see if anything could be done.

But all she could do was still watch her notifications roll in, completely helpless to check them.

But she did come up with a way to protect her precious phone from the merciless elements.

Liz still doesn’t have her phone back, but she’s holding out hope.

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People Are Trolling Burger King's New 'O.K. Google' Commercial With Epic Results

People Are Trolling Burger King’s New ‘O.K. Google’ Commercial With Epic Results

When it comes to marketing, you’ve got to think outside of the box.

Simply getting on camera and talking about how awesome your product is doesn’t really do it for consumers anymore. We’ve become a little too jaded and savvy for that.

So you’ve got to think outside of the box, something that Burger King thought it was doing when it prompted customers to ask their Google device what’s in a Whopper Burger. The actor in the ad says, “O.K. Google, what is the Whopper Burger?”

The 15-second ad seems harmless enough.

Now the problem with this, is that it pulls the data from Burger King’s Wikipedia Page. Once the Internet found it, it edited BK’s Wikipedia page with some hilarious results.

Depending on when you ran the commercial, the Whopper contains cyanide, dead children, woodchips, poison, or mustard gas.

People were quick to point out to Burger King that it was their own darn fault for trusting Wikipedia in the first place.

Others were just upset that Burger King would create an intrusive ad.

And thought the burger company had what’s coming to them.

While those in the PR and marketing business are saying that BK only benefits from the backlash because all exposure = good exposure.

As long as you’re thinking about burgers, you’re gonna get hungry sooner or later. Great, now I want one of their new chicken sandwiches. I guess it’s totally working on me?

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