This Planet Fitness Member Was Arrested for Doing 'Naked Yoga'

There’s been a lot said and done about the Planet Fitness franchises’ “lunk alarms.”

Hardcore gym-rats despise the franchise for encouraging members to report overly-enthusiastic workout behaviors from fellow exercisers.

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The 34-year-old Massachussetts man had to explain himself to police after he reportedly walked around the Plaistow Planet Fitness, where he was a member, completely nude.

Officers who reported to the scene found Stagno lying face down in a yoga position wearing nothing but his birthday suit. When they asked him to get up and escorted him off the premises, Stango complied without incident or protestation. He only said one thing according to police Captain Brett Morgan.

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“The only statement that he made was that he thought it was a ‘judgment free zone’ – apparently referencing the chain’s slogan,” Morgan said in statement to WBZ-TV.

Gym members who saw the man strutting his stuff at the Planet Fitness location said they felt “sick” and “unsafe,” according to Morgan. 

As weird as Stagno’s story is, strange people doing strange things at the gym is nothing new.

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You have this guy who tried motivating runners, in the style of Mario Kart.

This 99-year-old woman who takes cocktail breaks between sets.

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This dude rocking a kitten singlet while helping someone train.

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This marching band who, I’m assuming, stepped in after a music speaker malfunction in the gym.

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This awesome dad who lets nothing get in the way of his workout.

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This woman who doesn’t conform to your workout attire standards.

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This guy who combined his love of knitting with cardio.

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This cyclist who takes his stationery bike sessions very, very seriously.

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Squats and reading are fundamental.

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Squatting in heels probably does wonders for one’s calves.

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Gym membership: $ 10 a month. Cable service: $ 90.

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Balance balls work with everything?

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Auditioning for the Broadway Spiderman revival.

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When you need to stay trim but gaming is life.

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“Mama always said I needed to be more headstrong.”

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“Batman might smell, but next time, the Joker will not get away.”

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Wario’s getting ready for Nintendo’s next party game.

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Ice cream at the gym.

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“Is this right? Yeah, it’s probably right.”

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“The Doc says I need to spend 20 minutes a day on the treadmill, fine.”

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I suddenly feel a heck of a lot better about my own workout habits.

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This Fitness Blogger Says Ditching Booze Was The Main Factor In Getting Ripped

It seems like a week doesn’t go by without a crazy new diet tip or fad storming the internet, promising you that all of your weight loss woes are over.

It always starts with some “new knowledge.” You know, like carbs are bad for you, no it’s your daily caloric intake, no, it’s wine, no, it’s sugar, no, it’s actually not enough carbs released slowly throughout the day. Red meat’s bad for you one day, then the next day vegan diets are terrible. It seems like whatever you want to believe, you can find an “expert” who will confirm whatever it is.

It’s all a bit maddening.

However, there are some fitness and diet tips that are backed by science and are applicable to the vast majority of the population. It’s probably also best to try diet advice that, you know, was actually followed by someone who had great results with said advice and knows what they’re doing.

And if you ask any athlete or a person who specializes in fitness or bodybuilding, they’ll probably tell you that cutting out booze completely or greatly mitigating your alcohol intake is a huge part in staying fit. And fitness blogger Jelly Devote agrees.

She compared her body and how she feels today to her body seven years ago to how she felt back then. The difference is astounding and her cutting back on drinks had a lot to do with that.

ALCOHOL VS WATER 🥂💦
UNHEALTHY VS HEALTHY 🍩🥗
UNHAPPY VS HAPPY ☹️🤩
20 VS 27 YEARS 👱🏼‍♀️👵🏼 

Here’s the thing though: for Jelly, it isn’t about numbers on a scale – she doesn’t even weigh herself.

People always ask how much I’ve lost, and I honestly don’t know what my highest weight was (not the picture) due to hating myself so much I didn’t weigh myself (probably around 75kg) and I don’t weigh myself anymore (lightest I’ve been 45kg, NOT HEALTHY MIND) 🙆🏼‍♀️🤷🏼‍♀️💁🏼‍♀️ 

If you take a look at the caloric content of most alocholic beverages, you’ll see that they’re filled with sugar. For example, 4 ounces of champagne has 95 calories – and all of it is sugar. A 12-ounce bottle of Heineken? 150 calories. So two beers and a flute of champagne will put you at almost 400 calories, not to mention any snacks you might be munching on in between drinks.

There’s also another problem big drinkers face that could be messing up their weight loss – even if their workout regimen and solid meals are on point: their liver function.

The liver plays a huge role in helping your body metabolize fat, which is basically breaking fat molecules down so your body can use it as energy.

Excessive drinking may inhibit your liver’s ability to do that, so you’re doing yourself and your fitness goals a disservice by pounding down the brewskies. It’s not just the empty calories – you won’t be able to burn fat as efficiently even if you are within your daily caloric limits.

Just looking at the difference between a healthy liver and a damaged one tells you all you need to know about the dangers of too much booze. Plus, since the liver also acts as a filter for toxins in your body, a prime functioning one will help give you energy throughout the day to tackle those intense workouts and just overall feel better about yourself.

Which is what it’s all about at the end of the day, isn’t it?

Although Jelly has a pretty strong Instagram game, she’s not afraid to let everyone know that more often that not, no matter how in shape someone gets, their body doesn’t look so glamorous in every position.

And although we all know that in the back of our minds, it’s comforting to know how much of it is “smoke and mirrors.”

Because at the end of the day you can only make your body look as good as it possibly can for you.

That doesn’t mean you’re any less sexy or dedicated as someone else – as long as you work to your highest ability, you’ll be happy. It’s a cheesy message, but one that Jelly promotes in a ton of her posts.

Even if her before and after photos are night and day transformations.

Pretty darn motivational.

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This Mother And Fitness Model Wants Women To Focus On Their Bodies Instead Of Their Scales

Diet shakes, fat burners, green tea extract, body wraps, crash diets, liposuction, and gastric bypass.  If you’ve ever contemplated dropping a few (or more) pounds, you’ll have come across a number of those options, either by reading articles on how to ‘tone up’ or through ads that would start pelting them your way after you’ve searched google twice for a diet plan.

For as long as I can remember, women around me, regardless of age, ethnicity, or cultural background, were obsessed with losing enough weight to hit a specific number.

I recall my mother and her friends exchanging tapes with one another, have seen people go to homeopathic doctors and come back with overpriced generic supplements, and have read article after article of people opting to go on extreme crash diets for month to reach that oh so very special number, be it the incredibly flawed BMI scale that’s seen posted on the walls of every school gym or in pursuit of a dress size that’s also regularly a hot button issue in society today.


According to this I’m roughly the height of a redwood

I didn’t learn about body composition until I started participating in competitive strength sports in my late 20s, which was also (coincidentally) the same time I actually started getting healthy.  I can write a separate article on men if there’s demand for it, but the social pressures nowadays really don’t target us.  No, those crosshairs are always their way, it’s people like Kelsey Wells that are going to help change that.

Wells came out of her pregnancy 25 pounds heavier than she did when going in. She decided to get back in shape 8 weeks post partum, picking a training program that appealed to her and went to work.

The photos show her at her starting weight, 8 weeks post-partum, the lowest weight she reached after 8 weeks on the program, and the last one has her looking much healthier months later and near her initial starting weight.

The Bikini Body Guide (BBG) program she was following recommended that people using it take full body photos along the way and not just base progress on the readout from their scale.

I weighed 130 before getting pregnant, so based on nothing besides my own warped perception, I decided my ‘goal weight’ should be 122 and to fit into my skinniest jeans. Well after a few months of BBG and breastfeeding, I HIT IT and I fit into those size 0 jeans. Well guess what? I HAVE GAINED 18 POUNDS SINCE THEN. EIGHT FREAKING TEEN…

I have never had more muscle and less body fat than I do now. I have never been healthier than I am now. I have never been more comfortable in my own skin than I am now.

Wells went into detail in her post, saying that had she kept to tracking progress through the scale only, she would’ve given up, decorating the caption with a catchy #screwthescale hashtag that caught on rather quickly.

Yesterday she appeared as a fitness model on Cosmo, a move which may have prompted her to show the behind the scenes work that went into securing that photoshoot.

The big takeaway that Wells was pushing for was for people to not attach their self-worth and progress to a number on a scale.  

The fixation has led to a $ 62 Billion supplement industry and $ 58 Billion (2014 figures) weight loss industry, which includes the assorted diet drinks you see decorating the shelves in your local Walmart.

Have an opinion on the topic, or would you like to see something else written about it?  Leave a comment under the article and I’ll drop by.

(h/t elitedaily)

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