This Kid's Brutally Honest Response To A Homework Assignment Is Too Relatable

This Kid's Brutally Honest Response To A Homework Assignment Is Too Relatable

Call it hipster-ism, call is selfishness, or call it extreme love, but there are some things we cherish and value so much that the knowledge of them becomes so precious that you want it all to yourself.

I remember loving a video game for Playstation so much when I was younger that when my friend at the time (who had an N64) talked about getting a PS and that game, I suddenly became very territorial and did everything in my power to talk him out of it.

It’s pretty weird when I look back at it now, but I really thought that there was no way he could appreciate the game as much as I did at the time. Plus, he had a bunch of other games he was good at and liked playing, let that game be my thing, you know?

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As it turns out though, I wasn’t the only greedy kid who wanted certain experiences all to themselves.

When twitter user @mum_reader decided to contribute her thoughts to the trending conversation for #NationalWritingDay, she shared this wonderful homework assignment from her son was he was six-years-old.

People loved how fervently the kid loves his favorite book.

People wanted to know what book captured his heart. I mean a piece of literature that could make a 6-year-old that passionate about reading must be special.

And it’s this bad boy right here. Just judging from the title, it looks pretty amazing.

When it comes to sassy assignment responses, students have been providing endless entertainment for the internet for a very long time.

Like this kid who doesn’t feel the need to explain themselves.

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Or Hope here who wants to name her rectangle Tedison.

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I mean the student’s technically correct. If you want someone to follow instructions you had in mind, then make sure you write them down as clearly as possible. It’s simple.

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He’s write, hitting defenseless animals sucks.

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Again, there’s nothing wrong with these answers.

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Who thought about the feelings of the first cells? Hmm? Now this student might’ve failed biology, but they passed empathy.

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Now I’d argue that the Situation’s torso has a much more exaggerated taper, but you definitely know what this student is going for.

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This assignment is opinion-based, so the answer can’t technically be wrong.

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Besides, this kid understands that without love, ruling the world isn’t a worthwhile endeavor. That’s why it’s number 3 on the list.

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This Fourth Grade Homework Assignment About Slavery Has People Furious

There are a lot of great, hardworking teachers out there. There are also a bunch of teachers who seem to see the classroom as a place to work out their own issues. Teachers are people, and a lot of people are racist. A woman named Trameka Brown-Berry shared a homework assignment her son, Jerome, brought home from school illustrating exactly that.

Brown-Berry posted a photo the assignment questions Jerome was asked to answer. For context, he’s only in the fourth grade. The worksheet demands that he give three “good” reasons for slavery and three bad ones. Good is in quotes, I guess to indicate that they wouldn’t really be good reasons? Which is a red flag the teacher should have paid attention to. If you already think your question is stupid enough to need qualifiers, don’t ask it.

Young Jerome responded by saying there was no good reason for enslaving people, and in the bad category listed a number of potential abuses suffered by men, women, and children under American slavery, including being beaten and separated from their families. His second answer clearly shows why his first answer is correct; there was nothing good about it.

BuzzFeed Newsreports that the teacher works in Our Redeemer Lutheran Church and School in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, and the worksheet was part of a social studies assignment. Brown-Berry isn’t mad that he was asked to discuss slavery, but how Jerome was asked to talk about it.

“It was the fact that she wanted my African-American son to name three good things for slavery. That’s insulting,” Brown-Berry told local news affiliate WESH 2.

The school attempted to explain the question as a misunderstanding, offering this statement:

“We understand that, as presented, the words used showed a lack of sensitivity and were offensive. The purpose of the assignment was not, in any way, to have students argue that ANY slavery is acceptable — a concept that goes against our core values and beliefs about the equality and worth of people of all races.”

But folks on Facebook are not having it. Some seem to think that it was just a  poor choice of words on the teacher’s part, and she actually meant what advantages slaveowners might have seen to owning slaves, making them defend such a brutal and horrendous system. But that’s a pretty complicated idea to boil down and describe as “good” reasons for slavery. People were mad:

Brown-Berry’s Facebook post attracted a lot of attention, and she recently posted a follow up saying that the teacher and school’s principal had offered a formal apology. They’re also going to be making some changes:

According to Brown-Berry, the assignment will be removed from the curriculum, and any future homework on sensitive topics will be sent home to parents first. 

Teachers will also be “trained in a cultural diversity/ cultural competency inservice” in an effort to prevent this sort of thing from occurring again, at least at this school.

“The moral of the story is, the only way to teach our kids to stand up for their rights and respect is to model it. With all of your support I was able to give my child a personal life lesson about how change starts with you,” she concluded.

And Jerome seems to be doing fine. At the end of the original assignment, he finished by writing, “I am proud to be black because we are strong and brave.” A strong, brave kid, with a strong, brave mother.

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Why This Superintendent Banned Homework For Elementary School Students

Florida Superintendent Heidi Maier is banning homework for elementary school students in her district. Instead, she’s asking them to read for 20 minutes each night. Where was this woman when I was a kid?!

Though it might seem like this cool superintendent is just three kindergartners in a trench coat, she’s actually banning the homework for a good reason: research shows that it just doesn’t improve academic performance for kids this young. Reading, on the other hand, does. 

“The quality of homework assigned is so poor that simply getting kids to read replacing homework with self-selected reading was a more powerful alternative,” said Richard Allington, a reading acquisition expert, in an email to The Washington Post. “Maybe some kinds of homework might raise achievement but if so that type of homework is uncommon in U.S. schools.”

Kids will be able to select their own book with help from educators, and children without a parent available to help them read at home will have access to volunteers, audiobooks, and other resources, according to Maier.

Middle and high school students, however, won’t be so lucky in Maier’s district. So don’t expect Algebra homework to be a thing of the past anytime soon.

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