Larry Nassar Complained About Listening To Survivor Statements And Judge Aquilina Wasn't Having It

Ex-Team USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison on Tuesday, after more than 150 women and girls came forward to accuse him of sexually abusing them. Circuit Court Judge Rosemarie Aquilina handed down the judgement, adding: 

Aquilina called issuing the sentence a “privilege,” adding: “I just signed your death warrant.” 

On Monday and throughout last week, 133 of Nassar’s accusers read out victim impact statements, with dozens more women choosing to remain anonymous, telling their stories of Nassar’s abuse and how it has affected their lives

Since then, athletes including Jeanette Antolin, Jessica Howard, Jamie Dantzscher, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman, Maggie Nichols, Gabby Douglas, Simone Biles, and Jordyn Wieber, have been among the more than 150 accusers. 

Aside from the incredibly powerful statements of some of the survivors, one of the main talking points of the last week has been Judge Aquilina. 

Aquilina has been praised on social media for focusing on the survivors over the last few days. When one survivor, Amanda Cormier, explained that she loved to write songs as a teenager, but that she hadn’t written one since the abuse, Aquilina gave some advice to the woman and her unborn baby: 

Every survivor received advice from Judge Aquilina. She told another woman: 

Aquilina told Rachael Denhollander, one of the first women to come forward, that she was the “bravest person I have ever had in my courtroom.”  

And one moment from Thursday has people loving Aquilina even more. Nassar wrote to a letter to the judge, complaining that he was unable to handle the continued victim impact statements because of his mental state, and which contained the phrase: “hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.” 

“You need to talk about these issues with a therapist,” the judge told Nassar. “Contrary to CNN’s headline, I’m not a therapist.” Moments later, she threw the letter onto the ground. 

Despite the attention she’s gotten on social media, Aquilina is refusing to comment to media, only saying that the week should focus on Nassar’s victims. 

That hasn’t stopped Twitter from praising the judge, though. With Simone Biles, one of the survivors, taking to social media with her thanks. 

There was also a flood of comments from the general public. 

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Judge Orders Man To Write 144 Nice Things About His Ex-Girlfriend

Maui Second Circuit Judge Rhonda Loo has ordered 30-year-old Daren Young to write 144 nice things about his ex-girlfriend after he violated her protection order. 

The woman sought a protection order after the two separated, which was issued Feb. 22, but two months later, Young called and texted her 144 times within a three-hour period, police said

Young was accused of saying “nasty things” in calls and text messages to the woman. Now, he has to write one “nice thing” for every “nasty thing.”

On top of that, Young was also sentenced to two years’ probation, 200 hours of community service, and a $ 2,400 fine. Prior to sentencing, Young had served 157 days in jail. 

Social media had mixed feelings about the decision. 

What do you think of this punishment? 

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Judge Gets Into Hilarious Courtroom Exchange With Woman Fined For Parking 2 Seconds Early

The laws are set up in a way, it seems, that you can be technically fined or penalized for everything. Unless you’ve got tons of evidence proving otherwise like clear photographs with time stamps and all that fun stuff, a judge probably won’t rule in favor of you getting out of a ticket. You’ll have just wasted a day of work and feel like an idiot for having any hope and contesting the fine in the first place.

So at the end of the day, it’s up to the clemency of a judge on whether or not someone’s innocent or guilty. Their ruling is all that matters so if you have to take something to court, usually you have to just pray that you get a judge who has a concept of justice that isn’t just black and white.

Thankfully, this woman received a judge who wasn’t a stickler for the rules.

Becuase you can only imagine her frustration at being given a ticket for parking in a spot 2 seconds before she was allowed to. No, I’m not making this up.

The best part of the court interaction is that once the judge saw the time she committed the offense, he had some fun with it.

Let’s get this lawmaker a sitcom.

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