These Popular Viral Stories Have One Thing in Common — They’re 100% Fake

These Popular Viral Stories Have One Thing in Common — They’re 100% Fake

You can’t trust everything in your Facebook feed. Thanks to, ahem, certain events from the past two years, people are finally becoming more aware of how easy it is to make fake memes, create Internet hoaxes, and spread mistruths. But hey, it’s 2018 now. You’d think we’d be a lot savvier by now when it comes to not falling for videos that were obviously produced by some marketing company. But you’ll be surprised how many of the biggest viral stories from the past few years were completely fabricated or even outright hoaxes — and yes, we fell for all of them. Below, a few viral stories you had no idea were fake.

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When Alan Rickman passed away in 2016, the Internet was flooded with photos and quotes to commemorate the late Harry Potter star. However, one of the most shared quotes wasn’t even real. It was a fake quote created by a fan on Tumblr. And another little fact to put a dagger in your Snape-loving heart? Alan never read the Harry Potter books.

WENT BACK TO KFC YESTERDAY AND SPOKE TO THE MANAGER SHE SAID IT IS A RAT AND APOLOGIZED, IT’S TIME FOR A LAWYER!!! BESAFE DON’T EAT FAST FOOD !!!

Posted by Devorise Dixon on Friday, June 12, 2015

Back in 2015, Devorise Dixon shared this nightmarish picture of a fried rat he found in a box of chicken tenders purchased from KFC. As the entire Internet dry heaved, KFC decided to test the “rat” at an independent lab. The results came back that the fried rodent was in fact chicken. Whew

Unfortunately, that fried rat head found at a Popeye’s was 100 percent real. 

Earlier this month, everyone couldn’t stop sharing a script from a fake Olive Garden commercial. Created by writer Keaton Patti, he tweeted that he made a robot watch hours of Olive Garden commercials and then had the bot generate a script. Although most of the Internet (ourselves included) thought the script was written by a real robot, it actually wasn’t. Artificial Intelligence is advanced, but it’s not that advanced.

“I wish people wouldn’t present these fakes as bot-written. Actual AI-written text just isn’t that coherent,”  scientist Janelle Shane explained on Twitter. “Neural nets learn by example. If you show it 1,000 hours of video (assuming 120,000 unique 30-sec Olive Garden commercials exist), you’ll get video out, not a script with stage directions.”

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This Facebook post from actress Meryl Streep’s Facebook made the rounds back in 2015. It was an uplifting post about an experience where an Italian director told her she was “too ugly” for a role. “Today I have 18 Academy Awards,” the post concluded. How inspiring! Too bad it wasn’t real, nor did it even come from Meryl’s real Facebook page (because she doesn’t have one).

Instead, the post was written by a fan. The incident, however, was a real one. Meryl told the story on The Graham Norton Show in 2015. According to her, while auditioning for a part in King Kong, Italian producer Dino De Laurentiis remarked in Italian, “Why do you bring me this ugly thing?” Meryl then replied, also in Italian, “I’m sorry I’m not beautiful enough to be in King Kong.”

Although the story was a real one, the actual Facebook post and the accompanied picture (which was not taken at the same time as her audition) were fake, and the account was later suspended for violation.

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Who remembers the time Paris Hilton pissed off the whole Internet with her tone-deaf shirt that mockingly blared, “Stop being poor”? Although the photo provided fuel for her haters, the picture was actually Photoshopped. The real picture showed her wearing a shirt that said, “Stop being desperate.” Yikes — we owe Paris an apology.

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This story was everywhere back in 2013, and the picture still makes the rounds on Facebook, but it’s #fakenews. 

According to a report in The Irish Times, a Chinese man sued his wife after she gave birth to a ridiculously ugly baby. After initially thinking his wife cheated on him, the wife confessed to having $ 100,000 worth of plastic surgery before they met, hence why the baby looked so different.

As hilarious as the story was, the report was completely fabricated by some Chinese newspaper, which was then picked up by other outlets. The picture that accompanied the story was a completely unrelated ad for a Taiwanese plastic surgery center. Taiwanese model Heidi Yeh posed for the family shot with three children whose faces were digitally altered. The text on the ad said, “The only thing you’ll ever have to worry about is how to explain it to the kids.”

However, the Internet has been circulating the picture for years thinking it’s real, much to Heidi’s dismay. She confessed in 2015 that the viral story has ruined her life and her career. “I realized the whole world was spreading it and in different languages,” she told the BBC. “People actually thought it was real. Even my then-boyfriend’s friends would ask about it.” 

Despite reports debunking the story, the picture still gets shared on social media even today.

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Back in 2014, one of the most vulgar memes involved drunken men loudly shouting “F–k her right in the p—y!” during live news broadcasts. It was incredibly tasteless, annoying, and drove newscasters crazy. And to make matters worse, the meme was ignited by a hoax.

Internet jokester John Cain created a fake video of a man, dressed in a hoodie and sunglasses, grabbing a microphone from a reporter and screaming the offensive phrase during a live broadcast. Even Gawker at the time reported that the video was a hoax. “These videos are terrible ‘viral’ hoaxes, and you should ignore them until they go away,” Jay Hathaway wrote.

But they didn’t go away. For the rest of that year, drunken sports fans, 12-year-old boys, and college hooligans delighted themselves in shouting the phrase every time they saw a camera. So, in a way, even though the meme started off as a hoax, through its popularity it morphed into a bonafide real meme. But still — ew.

Aww, although this was the most adorable viral story from 2015, this Japanese trend of owners trimming their dogs’ hair so that they look like cubes was largely false. First of all, the pictures came from a Taiwanese grooming store, not from Japan. Secondly, all the pictures (all three of them) only came from that one shop, which hardly counts as some newfangled “craze” or “trend.” Of course, that didn’t stop sites like Boing Boing and MTV from running the story anyway. Unfortunately, it’s just not true.

Pizza rat, in case you forgot, was a little rat, captured on camera by comedian Mike Little, dragging a slice of pizza down the subway steps. It was probably the most New York meme ever created and spurred dozens of Halloween costumes and Internet jokes. However, as much as it pains us to write this, Pizza Rat was fake.

The whole thing was a hoax by performance artist Zardulu, who told The Washington Post that she trained the rat to carry the pizza down the steps. The anonymous artist also took credit for other viral stories, like “selfie rat” and “raccoon riding an alligator.”

“In my art, I use highly trained rats to symbolize the shadow archetype and the subway as a symbol of our unconscious minds,” Zardulu revealed to Gothamist in a bizarre video. “I trained a rat to drag a piece of pizza down the subway stairs. Why has this become one of the most prolific videos of our generation? I believe because it symbolically completes us by incorporating our shadow into our conscious minds.”

Ooookay.

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Last year, Texas student JosephLongoria tweeted this bizarre photo of his teacher spying on the class by hiding in the ceiling during an exam. “My teacher left the room during a test so we all started sharing answers,” he tweeted. “Then I look up and she was staring right at me.” The photo instantly went viral, but Joseph later told Buzzfeed News that he made the whole thing up.

“I just had it along with the rest of my pictures,” he said. “I was deleting them because ya know, storage almost full, iPhone probs. So I decided to make it into a meme.”

As for the woman in the ceiling, no one knows who she is or where the picture originated from. Weird.

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Pizza Porn Is Getting Popular And We're Not That Surprised

The hardworking statisticians at Pornhub are back at it with new reports about our online habits, and we couldn’t be more grateful to them for their life-changing contributions to our understanding of human behavior.

Their newest findings? “Pizza porn” is spiking in porn searches everywhere, leaving us to wonder exactly what happens to the pizza delivery person during the “money shot.

“Pornhub has nearly 2000 videos with pizza in the title, and each month people search for pizza porn more than 500,000 times,” the insights team writes. 

While the standard “pizza delivery guy” remains popular in porn, the search terms related to pizza are certainly broadening. 

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“Amateur pizza dare.” There are a lot of possibilities with that one. 

It’s safe to say you’re more likely to consume pizza porn than your parents. 

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Clearly, there’s an age correlation between pizza porn popularity and age — the cheesy goodness is most popular among viewers ages 18 to 24 and least popular among viewers ages 65 and up.  

While pizza porn viewing does span across gender, men are more likely to search for it. Bet you never saw that coming, right? 

So where does your state rank in pizza porn consumption?

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Arizona and Utah really like their porn hot and oily (and cheesy). Mississippi, on the other hand, isn’t feeling too hungry.  

As it turns out, pizza porn has become a global phenomenon. 

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Romania and South Korea lead the world pizza porn consumption. Apparently, that cheesy goodness isn’t in very high demand in Japan, though. 

It all makes sense. There’s nothing sexier than pizza. 

Perhaps some videos take it too far? To each their own, we suppose…

We’re thinking pizza for dinner tonight. You?

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Troll beads have now become incredibly popular,

The first ever Troll bead was made by silversmith Søren Nielsen in 1976, when he designed and crafted a silver bead called “The Mask”, so called because the bead had six different faces, each with a different expression.

The original beads were silver and threaded onto pieces of leather.  After going on sale in the Copenhagen jewellers belonging to Søren and his sister Lise’s father, Svend Nielsen, they became popular very quickly and soon requests were being made for Trollbeads to be produced in a variety of different shapes, colours, sizes and materials.  In 1987, Lise Aagard opened a second store in Lyngby.  Today Trollbeads is still very much a family business, with the brand having been developed by the Nielsen/Aagaard family, and each family member with his or her own role.

By the 1980s Troll beads developed a lock for their bracelets which the wearer could then remove and re-attach to the chain, allowing the beads to be interchanged.  This new twist on an already very popular original design was to become one of the most recognisable traits of the Troll bead bracelet.  Towards the close of the 1990s, Lise Aagaard began to export and distribute Trollbeads outside of Denmark with her parent company, Lise Aagaard Copenhagen, and the following year introduced glass beads to the collection, which are made by turning the molten glass in a flame heated to 800 degrees.

Trollbeads are now available in a wide variety of materials, including pearl, silver, gold, and semi-precious and precious stones and are threaded on to a bracelet which can either be made from silver, leather or gold.  Other components include the removable lock and stoppers or spacer beads, which can either be used to prevent the Troll beads from falling off the bracelet or simply to space out a few of the beads in a pattern.

Trollbeads have now become incredibly popular, not only because of their versatility and the fact that the wearer can interchange the beads, but for other reasons too.  A Troll bead can be purely decorative; however there are many Trollbeads which can be used to signify an important event, memory or interest in the wearer’s life –much in the same way as traditional charm bracelets.  Some beads symbolize mythology, others are of plants and animals and others even make reference to science.  The Troll beads can then be arranged onto the bracelet as a reminder to the wearer of an anniversary, an achievement that they are proud of, or even as a memento of a holiday or to remind them of a friend.

Trollbeads make ideal gifts for loved ones, particularly as they are so very personal in nature.  A simple bracelet with a couple of starter beads makes a beautiful and original Christmas or birthday present, and allows the wearer to make the bracelet his or her very own by choosing different beads to continue the bracelet with.

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