This Photographer Captured Honest Mother's Day Photos To Show 'Mom Reality'

This Photographer Captured Honest Mother's Day Photos To Show 'Mom Reality'

Thanks to social media platforms like Instagram where people are obsessed with constantly depicting themselves in their best lights, it’s easy to forget that life isn’t always a glamorous, perfectly shadowed fun fest.

While scrolling your feeds this past Mother’s Day you probably saw a bunch of inspirational posts about the joys of parenthood. Their kids were probably smiling while dressed up in their cutest outfits and Mama had the best angle of her face with the just-right filter, broadcasting a flawless image of maternity to the world.

But anyone who’s ever raised a kid will tell you that all of that picturesque, “Instagram-approved” stuff is about 3% of what it’s actually like raising a kid. Something that Indiana-based photographer Giedre Gomes wanted to highlight with this Mother’s Day photo series that’s been getting a lot of attention.

Gomes, who is also a community member at Bored Panda, shared the photos to “remind everyone what motherhood really looks like.” And they certainly do.

My wife would agree that peeing alone is a total luxury.

Finding your sanity after a particularly long day filled with tantrums is a very real struggle parents face and we all cope in different ways.

For some, it’s with books.

For others, a quick chug of wine and some time to browse their phones like a normal human being for a few minutes is a vacation.

Trips to the store become tactical missions where you need to be on your toes the entire time.

If you hate cleaning up the same mess over and over again the span of two hours, well I’ve got some bad news for you if you’re planning on having kids.

The same goes for laundry.

In fact, you’ll probably be folding and refolding it multiple times a day.

And if you breastfeed your kids, then you know there’s nothing that gets between your babies and their meals.

You’re also their entertainment most of the time.

Oh and if you’re a fan of sleeping in or sleep in general, then you might want to rearrange your priorities.

Because the chances of you getting leg-dropped in the morning while half-asleep are very, very high.

You better take your showers quickly.

100% of the time you’re just working on saving your kids from themselves.

Getting sick is also not an option.

Gomes said that people who complained about the photos being “staged” are missing the point of the pictures: that all of these scenarios are situations that she, as a mother, has experienced.

As a parent myself, I can confirm that every single one of these images could have very easily been taken straight out a day in my own home with my kids.

Gomes was primarily focused on showing the “different side” of motherhood that doesn’t get enough exposure online, and honestly, I’m here for it. You can check out more of Gomes’ work on her Facebook and Instagram pages, as well as her website.

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Google Searches That Show Racism Embedded In the Algorithm

Racism existed before search engines, but Google has consistently not worked to prevent it.

Let’s look at some times Google’s algorithms could have done better.

1. The now classic example: the difference between searching for “three black teenagers” and “three white teenagers”

2. That time Google insisted that white people do not steal cars.

3. This Instagram user’s child began to Google “Why are asteroids…” when Google decided to take over and ask “Why are asians bad drivers?” 

4. And it’s not the first time Google has reinforced racial stereotypes through their suggested text. 

5. Here are some claims Google makes about Jewish people.

6. And here’s a stereotype the search engine feels is worth perpetuating.

Now, let’s dig a little deeper into the history of racist Google and the search engine’s responses to complaints. Remember the example we used in #1?

In 2016, 18 year old Kabir Alli Googled a simple phrase: “three black teenagers.” What appeared went viral: mugshots of black teenagers. When he googled “three white teenagers” the result was completely different: happy groups of white teenagers laughing and hanging out.

The outpouring of anger led to an apology from Google but also a statement that there was little they could do regarding the algorithm. Since this occurrence, people have tried to get Google to take for responsibility for their algorithm and recognize that the search engine is not neutral.

In her book, Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism, published this year by NYU Press, Safiya Umoja Noble explores how Google does not do enough to combat racism in the search engine and actually reinforces racial stereotypes.  Noble, an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California teaches classes on the intersection of race, class, and the internet. 

At Google in 2017, 91% of employees were white or asian. Additionally, only 31% of their workforce identified as women. When it comes to the tech portions of the corporation it gets even worse, with only 20% women and 80% men employees

Noble argues that algorithms are not neutral: they are created by people and filled with bias. Based on her extensive research, Noble believes that Google must take responsibility for the racism of the search engine. Algorithms are composed in computer code, and like all languages, this language reflects the culture it is created in. 

Noble found that Googling “black girls” quickly leads to porn. It also doesn’t take long when Googling “asian girls” to find sexualized women, wearing little clothing. When Googling “successful woman,” she most often found images of white women. 

When these instances emerge, Google always blames them on their “neutral” algorithm and does small fixes to those specific searches to change them. Noble argues that Google needs to take responsibility and have a larger reckoning, completely reworking algorithms.

Instead of opening up portals of information and increased understanding across difference, Google is reinforcing old stereotypes and giving them new life. To describe this, Noble coined a term “technological redlining” echoing racist housing practices of the second half of the 20th century. Today, technological companies are making invisible the way their programs and algorithms make decisions, and are effectively hiding the biases.  

As Safiya Umoja Noble recognizes, there are so many ways Google and other search engines could do better. 

First, tech companies need to recognize that algorithms are not inherently neutral. There is no easy fix for widespread biases, but  a more diverse workforce could begin to help these issues. 

Google is just the beginning, Noble hopes other tech companies like Yelp will learn similar lessons.

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Kenan Thompson Is Starting A Sketch Show For Kids That Sounds A Lot Like 'All That'

Kenan Thompson is teaming up with other All That alumni for a new children’s sketch comedy show called SKOOGLE—and don’t be surprised if you end up watching, too.

Thompson is the creator, executive producer, and voice of the title character of the show, who apparently is a digital assistant like Siri or Alexa, according to The Daily News. Kids will round out the rest of the cast as “entrepreneur inventors.”

Thompson is joined in producing the show by his former All That castmate Josh Server, and Albie Hecht, who was part of the team that developed All That, will serve as executive producer. The show will air on the new media brand “pocket.watch.” 

“Kenan Thompson is a comedic genius,” said Hecht, who is also pocket.watch’s chief content officer, in a statement. “At Nickelodeon, I witnessed first-hand Kenan and his fellow cast members’ ability to turn everyday scenarios into hilarious adventures.”

If they manage to match the genius of Pierre Escargot, I’ll be thrilled.

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Dutch Men Are Holding Hands To Show Support For Brutalized Gay Couple

Dutch Men Are Holding Hands To Show Support For Brutalized Gay Couple

The road to equal rights for any group that’s discriminated against is unfortunately one that’s filled with violence, terror, and heartache.

And although these heinous acts perpetrated against specific groups can’t ever really be stopped, we can control how we react to this violence.

It’s easy to get bitter and violent towards those who harm someone based on their gender, race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, or sexual orientation. But oftentimes the most profound responses to such unabashed hatred are the moments when people opt to show love to victims.

Like how Dutch men all over the Netherlands are holding each other’s hands in support of two gay men who were recently attacked.

A gang of men attacked Jasper Vernes-Sewratan and Ronnie Sewratan-Vernes as they walked together early one Sunday morning. One of the men was armed with a pair of bolt cutters, which they used in the attack.

Jasper wrote about the incident in a heartbreaking and scary Facebook post.

Posted by Jasper Vernes-Sewratan on Monday, May 27, 2013

Unfortunately, Ronnie and I also became a victim of a hate crime towards gays 😞, following the steps in anhem we are two of us to walk home provoked because we are more or less walking hand in hand (what we do Do it more often when we’re alone or walk) but so were attacked by a group of marokannen with between the ages of 14 and 18 years. I have always said that we weren’t crazy and wouldn’t let us know and we did so. Unfortunately had to be one of the guys, so apparently a bolt cutters and after what swearing up and down, it was like pulling and pushing all of a sudden it became so escalated, and eventually even the place fully and did all those guys at the same time on us, before I 😞Knew it was Ronnie out of my neighborhood and I had 3 man on me. I fought me out out but suddenly heard Ronnie screaming that all his front teeth were knocked out by one of those moroccans with so those bolt cutters, I went after her and the rest of them ran away and eventually, all of a sudden I could run towards Ronnie and what shows; His upper lip is one laceration, and he is no less than 4 front teeth and partly a 5th tooth lost by the clapping, the lip is now in the hospital but the teeth are a bigger problem and need to be reset. So we’re all going to cost a spoedtandarts.

What a nice date night was has become a nightmare what I personally catchy.

That this can still happen in 2017 is incomprehensible and hard to understand because in the end, we are just dutch in our own country, but it can’t be like that, apparently, in terms of homosexuality 😞.

A hashtag began in support of the couple, #allemannenhandinhand, which originated from Dutch journalist Barbara Barend.

It translates to: “Can this whole week all men (straight and gay) please just walk hand in hand …” 

So men started doing exactly that, all around the world.

Men from all professions and walks of life started tweeting photos of themselves holding hands with other men in a touching show of solidarity for the couple.

Dutch soccer clubs even got in on the act.

As did Rotterdam’s police force.

And members of the religious community.

The movement is gaining tons of momentum with more and more people across the Netherlands and all over the world showing their support for Ronnie and Jasper.

It’s important to note that the Netherlands was the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage back in 2001. But as anyone who’s taken two seconds to look at the progress of the Civil Rights Movement will tell you, widespread acceptance hasn’t been achieved yet.

Philip Tijsma, public affairs manager for COC Nederland, says that LGBT rights in the Netherlands have a long way to go.

“While some may think of the Netherlands as some sort of ‘gay paradise,’ the truth is that the layer of acceptance in this country is thinner than many people think. About 7 in 10 LGBT people say they have been confronted with physical and/or verbal violence because of their identity,” Tijsma said. “Plus, many LGBT students have a difficult time in high school, are bullied and see suicide rates that are almost five times higher than average.”

“The fight for equality continues,” CNN reported.

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