Disney's CEO Just Told Fans What They Can Expect From 'Deadpool 2'—And They're Ecstatic

One of the biggest reasons the original Deadpool film was such a huge success and earned Fox such a ginormous box office return was because Ryan Reynolds worked his butt off to ensure it was as Deadpool-ey of a movie as possible.

That meant violence. It meant gore. It meant sex and inappropriate jokes and a lot of breaking the fourth wall. 

Now that kind of thing might seem like a movie producer’s worst nightmare. Major motion picture studios looking for the highest rate of return are allured by family-friendly, safe cinematic choices. The more mundane and mediocre and inoffensive a film is, the more guaranteed of a return of investment, statistically speaking.

I mean, there’s a reason why a film about a bunch of murderous bad guys ended up being rated PG-13 and watered down to a “meh” mess. A “meh” mess that nabbed nearly $ 750 million at the box office.

Deadpool was a huge departure from that boring, MPAA-rating-friendly studio process and it ended up reaping the benefits. Fox greenlit a sequel almost immediately after the film’s opening box-office numbers came in, and things were looking great.

But Disney’s CEO, Bob Iger, assures fan that Disney’s got no problem with being in the R-rated film business, just as long as “audiences know what’s coming.”

Which means that the upcoming film won’t receive a whole bunch of edits and cuts for the sake of assuring the film isn’t “too edgy.”

Ryan Reynolds took the news of Disney’s buyout in typical Deadpool fashion.

And Twitter was ecstatic that their favorite foul mouthed red bodysuit wearing unkillable smart-cracking ninja won’t be censored.

But people don’t want the love to stop at Deadpool 2, they’re worried that Iger’s just talking about the film as if it’s a one time thing.

While others aren’t exactly holding out hope for the future.

It could make sense for Disney to keep some particular superhero films rated R. Movies like Logan and Deadpool could get their own treatment or exist in an “alternate timeline,” where the more family friendly films aren’t tied to their risque counterparts.

But seriously, the Deadpool movies need to stay rated R so when the Spiderman crossover films come out, this happens.

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Muslim Teen Told Dad She Wants To Take Off Her Hijab, And His Response Is Powerful

Muslim Teen Told Dad She Wants To Take Off Her Hijab, And His Response Is Powerful

When it comes to strictly religious societies, there’s a lot of shame and gossip that goes around. I wouldn’t say it’s the norm from the communities I grew up in. Most people just minded their business, went to the mosque, and did their own thing. 

There were a few Judgey McJudgersons who kind of ruined it for everybody else, but for the most part, people were able to do what they want without much backlash from their families or community. Hell, I’ve gone pretty much full rogue and have managed to keep all of my Muslim friends and family members. My wife also used to wear hijab and has long since removed it and, with the exception of a few people who think it’s their place to call her out on it (when I’m not around, I might add) nothing’s really changed in her life.

But that’s not to say there aren’t still Islamic countries and communities that use the hijab as an excuse to control women. But to assume that the only reason a woman would wear hijab is due to her family forcing her to wear it, is pretty darn insulting to the woman wearing it.

Which is exactly what happened to 17-year-old Lamyaa from Pennsylvania, who’s all but accustomed to receiving harassment online for being Muslim.

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“Personally, being an Arab Muslim woman in America, these sort of hateful messages aren’t uncommon,” she told Upworthy

A few days ago, on April 14th, 2017, Lamyaa tweeted a really disrespectful message from a stranger online.

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Someone was offended by the positive opinion Lamyaa had of her faith, and challenged her by saying that the only reason she was wearing a hijab was because her father was forcing her into it.

So Lamyaa texted her father and told him that she was going to take her scarf off. She then screenshot the conversation to prove a point.

Her father’s message rang loud and clear, shutting up the troll.

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Lamyaa:Baba, I want to tell you something.
Lamyaa’s father:Talk to me[asks her if she’s OK in Arabic]
Lamyaa:Yeah I’m okay. I was thinking. I want to take my hijab off.
Lamyaa’s father:Sweetheart that’s not my decision to make. That’s no man’s decision to make. If it’s what you feel like you want to do, go ahead. I’ll support you no matter what. Is everything okay? Did something happen? 

After Lamyaa posted her conversation online, it’s received over 140,000 retweets and more than 300,000 likes.

People tweeted messages of support and love for Lamyaa and her father.

Others were saying that the isolated hatred Muslim people were a target of is disproportionate to what other ethnic groups experience.

Lamyaa posted the screenshots of her convo to fight stereotypes about Muslim women, and men, when it comes to the hijab.

“People believe that Islam is misogynistic, hateful, or violent, and I think that stems from their inability to differentiate culture and religion. Islam is a religion and, like all religions, it is what you bring to it.”

Lamyaa also pointed out that she wasn’t trying to say that there aren’t Muslim women who are forced into wearing hijab – because there are.

But she wanted to point out that there are tons of Muslim women, like Lamyaa, who wear the Hijab because they choose to, and to assume that they’re being forced into it is dismantling their agency as women, based solely on their religion. (h/t upworthy)

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People Are Sharing Things That Santa Once Told Them And We Can't Stop Laughing

This year has been a long year, and with Christmas coming up, we’re finally winding things down with last minute holiday shopping and improvised travel plans with people named Lauren that still have no idea what it means to pack their things ahead of time so we can leave on time, but that’s beside the point.

While the rest of us responsible travelers were sitting around and waiting for everyone else to make this holiday weekend the stress-fest we knew it would be, the #SantaOnceToldMe hashtag surfaced and people used it to share some holiday cheer. And jeers because, you know, it’s the internet, but mainly cheer. Check them out.

  1. Let’s start off with something positive

  2. Here’s the Twitter we know and love

  3. Mind = Blown

  4. All we ever did was wreck him.

  5. Last minute tip:

  6. We’ve all had our suspicions

  7. Oof

  8. Also explains why he doesn’t mind the cold

  9. I guess cashew milk will have to do

  10. Well that’s a little different

  11. Hmph

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J.K. Rowling Told Us Everything We Need To Know About The American Wizarding School

In anticipation for the upcoming Fantastic Beasts, J.K. Rowling has written some background to the American School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Ilvermorny.

The houses for Ilvermorny School of Witchcraft and Wizardry are each named after the favorite magical creature of the family members who founded the school. While we don’t yet know the complete personality profiles of each house, here they are: 

Wampus, which “favors warriors.”

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One of two sons, Webster Boot, chose Wampus, because he was “argumentative but fiercely loyal.”

 

Horned Serpent, which “favors scholars.”

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Mother to the family Isolt Sayre chose the Horned Serpent because she felt a kinship with the creature.

Pukwudgie, which “favors healers.”

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The father of the family, James Steward, chose the Pukwudgie because Isolt made a joke about one once. Classic dad move. 

And Thunderbird, which “favors adventurers.”

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The second brother, Chadwick Boot, chose Thunderbird, because they were “intelligent but often temperamental.”

The complete history of the school is here, but summarized the best snippets below:

Isolt was born in around 1603 and fled Ireland for America to escape her abusive aunt, Gormlaith Gaunt. The Gaunts are ancestors of Voldemort. 

In America she met James Steward, a muggle who saw her using magic. She had planned to kill Steward, but they instead fell in love and adopted two orphaned magical boys, Chadwick and Webster.

Isolt set up Ilvermorny for magical children and named it after her childhood home in Ireland. 

Ilvermorny runs in a similar fashion to Hogwarts because Isolt had read about the school in England. 

At one point, Isolt discovers that her wand belonged to Salazar Slytherin and contained basilisk horn. They buried the wand, but it soon sprouted a snakewood tree.

The robes of the school are blue and cranberry because Isolt wanted to be in Ravenclaw as a child and James loved cranberry pie. 

And yes, you can get sorted into your own Ilvermorny house if you don’t fancy going to Hogwarts after Brexit. 

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