Texans Without Ice Scrapers Got Really Creative To Clear Their Cars

Winter storm Inga is bringing deep snow and freezing conditions to Texas, and while hundreds of  thousands of students are getting the day off, people still need to get to work. 

The problem? No one seems to own an ice scraper. This is Texas, after all. They’re far more accustom to heatwaves than snow storms. That means Texans have had to get pretty inventive when it comes to their morning commute. 

A frisbee is probably going to take you a while…

Some people went with clothes hangers. 

That’s just going to scratch your window…

Some people went with science. 

A key chain will take you hours. 

Gift, credit, and membership cards didn’t go so well for most people…

Others took to Twitter to offer some hacks for the poor Texans. 

Some people from up north weren’t so kind. 

You’ll get through this, Texas.

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We Just Learned What Owls Look Like Without Feathers And There's No Going Back

Generally speaking, knowledge is power. Why not learn as much as possible to become a more interesting, useful, and education person? You never know when certain information will come in handy. 

This clichéd wisdom, however, has its limits. Perhaps there are some areas we really don’t need to explore. There are things that can’t be unlearned once we’ve seen and absorbed them… And that knowledge may haunt us forever. 

Thanks to the Internet, we now know way too much about owls. 

It all began when entertainment writer and Twitter phenom Dana Schwartz noticed a particularly plump bird resting on boyfriend’s air conditioner in New York City. 

But the vigilant people of Twitter would not tolerate such bird body shaming without all the facts. 

All birds are beautiful, after all. 

That’s when Schwartz came to her senses. “I realized I had no idea what owls looked like without feathers,” Schwartz told Distractify.

So, she did some research: “The answer is…nightmares” she said. 

Graciously, she decided to share her important findings with the public. 

These findings left everyone rattled. So Twitter tried to make sense of it all.  

Who knew that cute chubby, owls were actually mutant dinosaurs of our nightmares?

Schwartz, herself, is not deterred. “I think they’re even cuter [now],” she says. 

Tragically, this information no one asked for spawned more photos of creepy, naked animals to haunt our nightmares. 

Cute animals will never be the same. You’re welcome. 

While we can’t promise any more frightening factoids about owls, we can suggest you absorb more of Schwartz’s wisdom in her book And We’re Off, available for preorder on Amazon

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This Skydiver Is About To Be The First Person To Jump Without A Parachute

Those of us who play it safe in life could probably learn something from Luke Aikins. One of the best skydivers in the world Aikins has made a total of 18,000 jumps in his life. He’s set world records, trained elite divers, and performed stunts in movies… But his most recent project takes things to another level.

He’ll be the first person ever to jump 25,000 feet without a parachute or wingsuit and (hopefully) land safely. 

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“I’m trying to treat it like just another jump,” Aikins told CBS Los Angeles

Well, we’re not convinced that’s possible since all the other jumps have had that handy parachute there, but what do we know? 

When speaking to U.S. News and World Report, he mentioned that he thought the idea was crazy several years ago when some Hollywood producers pitched him the idea in an attempt to create an epic reality T.V. stunt. He recalled the conversation he had with his wife at the time:

I said, ‘You won’t believe these guys. They want me to jump out without a parachute.’ She said, ‘Oh, with a wingsuit.’ I said, ‘No, they want me to do it with nothing.’ We both had a good laugh about that.

Turns out, the producers planted the seed in his head— and he had to try it out.

As far as qualifications go, Aikins couldn’t be better prepared. 

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youtube / cbs los angeles

The forty-two-year-old has a lifetime of experience skydiving. He made his first jump at age twelve and her first solo jump at age sixteen— and he’s done around eight hundred jumps a year since then. 

Aikins has previously taught skydiving, worked with skydiving instructors, and even done some stunts for Iron Man 3. The guy knows what he’s doing.

And there are some safety measures in place. 

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Aikins will drop into a literal safety net— one that is about a third of the size of a football ball and twenty stories high. Allegedly, the net will provide sufficient space to cushion his fall while ensuring we won’t bounce out. 

And he doesn’t take this endeavor lightly; he has a wife and a four-year-old son to come home to after the jump. “If I wasn’t nervous I would be stupid,” he told U.S. News And World Report. “We’re talking about jumping without a parachute, and I take that very seriously. It’s not a joke.”

Don’t worry, there have been some ‘rehearsals’ for the big event.

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During test runs (with parachutes) at the drop location, Aikins has landed in the same spot seventy-three times in a row. 

…Here’s to hoping it happens a seventy-fourth time.

Yes, you’ll be able to watch the jump (if you dare). 

Fox will be broadcasting the two-minute jump live at 8 p.m. EDT on Saturday. We recommend watching with a drink and stress ball in hand. 

So, why do this?

“To me, I’m proving that we can do stuff that we don’t think we can do if we approach it the right way,” Aikins answered.

…Fingers crossed. (h/t us news and world report)

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