Man Goes On Twitter Rant About Trump's Recent New York Times Interview—And We Agree

Arguing on the internet is oftentimes about as useful as peeing against the wind. Sure, you might really need to get it out, but it almost always ends up spraying back in your face.

People’s opinions rarely change no matter how much evidence you bring to them. No matter how many good points you make, no matter how many other issues you present that are way more important to focus on than the inconsequential, often sensationalized issues they choose to focus on – you won’t change someone’s mind on the internet.

Oftentimes, merely criticizing someone’s point or questioning them will have them cry “persecution” and that you’re being unfair to them. It’s a trait tons of dictatorial regimes have utilized in discrediting media agencies for catching them in lies and exposing the weak points in their propaganda.

Trump’s popularized the term “fake news” and used it as a blanket statement to try and discredit any news agency that questions and disproves many of the President’s erroneous claims. 

The divisive nature of Trump’s election has left people with very strong opinions on how the press should treat him. However, the objective of traditional press has always been to provide factual evidence and question individuals on the facts. The media in America was expected to be a watchdog of the government to keep our elected officials honest, since the earliest days of our democracy.

Washington Star correspondent Daniel Dale offered an interesting take on the role journalists should take when interviewing Donald Trump and politicians like him who constantly lie in a manner that doesn’t destroy the entire q & a.

Dale stresses professionalism and politeness.

It’s much more powerful to allow a lying politician, President or not, acknowledge their lie in a follow up answer and just carry on with the interview.

He also highlighted the difference between interview and print lies.

It’s all about maintaining composure.

He stressed that basic questioning is a journalist’s job, there’s nothing “gotcha” about it.

Ultimately, Dale just wanted to highlight the correct way to interview someone like Trump who has a penchant for making wild claims without evidence in his q & a’s.

Some people responded to the thread by pointing out some of the worst lies Trump’s told in his interviews.

And how journalists let him get away with it.

Do you feel like the media needs to be tougher on Trump? Or is it a losing battle at this point?

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New York Public Library's New Book Train Will Take Your Inner Book Nerd For A Ride

If you were a fan of New York Public Library’s two block long Rose Reading Room, I’ve got some good news for you; the ceiling restoration is complete and the room is scheduled to be reopened on October 5th. 

That’s great news for any bookworm, student, or person that can’t stand sitting at a Starbucks while the Pumpkin Spice craze is still going on. The movie scenes shot in the room do it no justice, and the only real complaints people ever had was how much lugging around they had to do if they wanted to pick up a research book from the other side of the library on one of its 11 floors. 

That is now a thing of the past.

With the recent expansions and book relocations, planners kept the citizens of New York City in mind when they came up with this new delivery system. Each of the 24 ‘carts’ can hold up to 30 pounds of materials, can travel vertically or horizontally,  and take only 5 minutes to work through all 11 levels of the library thanks to their 75 feet per minute speed. The carts also have built in sensors so you can track your delivery when it’s on route to you.

The $ 2.6 million dollar was part of an initiative to help make the Rose Reading Room an even more pleasant experience for those that would be spending countless hours there going through however many of their 4 million volumes of research material they had to.

Matt Knutzen, the director of the Humanities and Social Sciences Research Divisions within the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, said in a statement, “Our priorities include preserving our materials and making them increasingly accessible to the public in an inspiring space for research. Our recent storage expansion, our restoration of the Reading Room, and the installation of this system are all elements of that work.”

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