There Is A Hidden Meaning In The Division Sign You've Probably Never Noticed

On Monday, Twitter user Abdul Dremali tweeted an observation about the division symbol that quickly went viral for making everyone see their childhood math lessons differently.

According to BuzzFeed, there’s some anecdotal truth to this idea. While the symbol, known as an obelus, was once used to signify uncertainty in a quotation or even subtraction, it isn’t clear why it was eventually adopted as a division symbol in 1659. But math teachers have used it ever since to help teach students that division is just making two numbers into a simplified fraction—and it isn’t the only symbol in which Twitter users have noted a clever design.

And guess what—‰ is called the permille and ‱ is called the permyriad. You can see how they get their names—per cent means per hundred and per mille means per thousand, derived from Latin. A “myriad” is an outdated way to say ten thousand.

That one’s not technically math, but I bet you never realized that (or, at least I didn’t). For many of these, I just wish I knew the meanings of the symbols when I was struggling in elementary school math.

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You've Probably Been Using Lemon Juicers Wrong This Whole Time

Juicing lemons with a handheld manual juice press can seem like an obvious process, but you might be missing a step that makes all the difference!

The common squeezing technique might look a bit like this:

The more practical and efficient way is to cut the bottom end of the citrus and let the convex part of the press flush out the juices by mashing the pulp.

This type of juicing technique fits in with other ways of juicing where the pulp is being pressed on by a convex structure and twisted.

If this comes as a shock to you, you are not alone!

It’s never too late to learn something new! Take this tip and make the most out of your citrus juicing adventures.

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This Is Worse Than Any Pimple Popping Video You've Ever Seen Before

Welcome. If you’re reading this right now, then you’ve also spent hours upon hours on YouTube looking at everything from cyst and blackhead extractions to human bot fly and tapeworm removals. And you like it. I’m glad that’s the case.

You see, this video is pretty special. I’ve seen plenty of cyst extractions that have emptied out a peanut butter jar’s worth of hard pus and keratin from a person’s back. I’ve also seen people coat their mirrors in a layer of greasy discharge from a neck, jaw, or forehead pimple. It was always pretty neat to watch.

This one however, is a game changer. Suddenly, the violator is in a person’s mouth. He can feel it. He can taste it. Brandon wrote on Reddit that his tongue was in pain for a few days, and after finding the lump and seeing pus/mucus ooze out, he went to the dentist who ultimately told him that his salivary gland had a blockage and a salivary stone was forming.

When it was ripe for the picking, he did us a favor and recorded the removal for us to see. He pushes his tongue to the roof of his mouth and exerts some pressure. This is the result: 

Gross.

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